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Lessons from the iPod Touch

I got an iPod Touch as sort of a gift for my birthday last year. Since then, I haven’t let go of it. When I broke my laptop’s keyboard and touch pad, I was blogging mostly from my iPod touch and it has been my main computer even after my laptop has been reincarnated. I was uploading a few pictures to facebook and I realized a few lessons I learned from the iPod touch.

  1. You don’t need a lot to make things happen. When I got the iPod touch, I was downloading apps left and right. You’ll notice in the archives that I didn’t post a lot last October that was because I was working as a software tester. I downloaded a few hundred apps and tested it out. Now I only have and use a few apps. As a result, I’m able take pictures, write, publish and connect with ease and almost from anywhere. Did I mention I didn’t have to carry around my laptop anymore?Portability is better than power.
  2. Bring out your best in bright happy places and avoid dark gloomy areas. The iPod touch’s camera works perfectly in bright settings and is almost useless in the dark. It does it’s job well of capturing moments that I’d like to capture. Somehow, its limitations tell me what it does best. I think about how I’ve been down the past few months and realize that I’ve done well in a bright positive environment and had sucked in dark toxic environments. I’m making this change now and I invite you to do the same. I don’t know exactly where this will take us but I’m pretty sure it will be a lot better than sulking in the dark.
  3. If you can’t do what you want, it means you aren’t letting go of something you’re too attached to. I realized that I filled up 8gig pretty quickly with songs, videos and games. The culprit are movies I still want to watch, and games I already finished but was holding on to because of the high score. In my case I chained myself to a lot of memories and doing so hinders me from freely moving forward. Untether, delete, let go. In my case it was something as simple as unsubscribe and not looking at a certain facebook profile.
  4. You can move freely with less moves. I tested out a lot of apps. There are a lot of beautiful apps. Some work better than the other. Now I’m sticking with simplenote and the regular camera app and the regular social network apps. I use Nexus money to track my spendings and Wordpress to publish my posts. No viber or Nimbuzz for me. I also use instagram and tumblr. In real life tasks that require too much steps also end up not being completed which brings us to the next learning.
  5. Relying on multitasking is bullshit. Everytime I had several running apps in the background one of two things happen, one is that i don’t get anything done because I’m thinking about all the open apps at the same time, all while thinking which one to do first or two is that the big app crashes and forces me to restart it. I notice how the same thing happens when I’m working with powerful apps. Too much steps result in too many things to think about or play with. The apps I’m using allows me to just write, edit, take pictures and post. That’s it. My small success come from doing just one small thing and adding a couple more after completion. Imagine this, we’re talking about a really sensitive issue but I’m thinkin about business elsewhere. Sounds familliar right? Moving on… 6.Limitations are good for you. While the iPod Touch is not full featured like the iPhone because it doesn’t have the bigger camera and the ability to text and call, using it as my main device forces me to be creative. I use apps that work well with or without wifi, I delete apps and files I don’ use regularly, and I take pictures at daylight or in a bright setting. The best part is I don’t need to pay a huge price to get what I want for it. I’m thinking something doesn’t need to have everything to be perfect. It just needs to be available and useful for you.

If you’re wondering about the other pictures I’m posting them here for you to enjoy.

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